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Morals, values, and civility: the memory of John McCain

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Morals, values, and civility: the memory of John McCain

Senator John McCain walks out of the chambers after voting no to repealing Obamacare. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Senator John McCain walks out of the chambers after voting no to repealing Obamacare. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Getty Images

Senator John McCain walks out of the chambers after voting no to repealing Obamacare. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

Getty Images

Getty Images

Senator John McCain walks out of the chambers after voting no to repealing Obamacare. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

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BRUNSWICK, OH – John McCain lived a life full of service to our country. Mr. McCain began his service in the United States Navy where he served as a naval aviator, flying ground-attack aircrafts and aircraft carriers. He then switched to a life of politics and served until his death on August 25, 2018, age 81 , serving as a United States Senator for the state of Arizona. He had a loud voice in the Senate and was a role-model for many political figures.

Mr. McCain was shot down and captured by the Northern Vietnamese during an operation in 1967. He was taken as a prisoner of war until 1973. During those years, he was tortured and left with wounds that would lead to permanent physical disabilities. He retired from the Navy in 1981 and then started a career in politics, running for the United States House of Representatives.

In 1982, he won a House seat and stayed there for two terms before running for the United States Senate. He continuously served in the Senate until his recent death. Mr. McCain ran for the Republican nominee for president in 2000 but lost to George W. Bush. He ran again and won the Republican nomination in 2008 but lost in the general election to former president Barack Obama.

Mr. McCain was known as the “maverick” in the Senate because of his willingness to openly disagree with his own party on certain issues. More recently, his opposition to the repeal of President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) shocked the country. On live television he raised his hand and gave a thumbs down showing his vote to save the Affordable Care Act. Mr. McCain was not afraid to stand up for what he believed in – a strong guide for what our political leaders should be like.

Currently, the Arizona governor has named former senator Jon Kyl as his replacement. Kyl stated that he is not seeking re-election, causing there to be an unknown of what the future holds for Mr. McCain’s seat.

“McCain had a history of working with Democrats and certainly in congress today we need more of that. The question is, what will his replacement be like?” says Advanced Placement Government teacher, Luke Beal.

Both Democrats and Republicans alike are wondering what the future holds for the Senate. Will the replacement be someone who is willing to compromise, or will it be a strong Conservative voice? Regardless of the new position, the attention shifts from focusing on his physical replacement to filling his leadership role.

“For the future, it is time for someone to stand up and fill his role. John Mccain leaving gives us a vacuum of leadership and will give someone the opportunity to stand up and fill his role,” says Advanced Placement United States History teacher, Mark Belkofer.

Overall, Mr. McCain was a man of integrity and pursued the interest of the country over his own. His loss will not go unnoticed in our current political atmosphere. It is times like these that someone needs to step up and be the new example.  

“John Mccain to me was part of the old generation who, although you did not agree with all the time, you believed their heart was in the right place. Things were not personal, they were civil. Throughout his life you saw that play out,” says Belkofer.

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Morals, values, and civility: the memory of John McCain