• August 21Follow us on Twitter, @TheDevilier

The Devilier

A controversy of Olympic caliber: Pyeongchang 2018

Athletes+for+Team+Russia+wear+matching+attire+for+the+2014+Opening+Ceremony+in+Sochi.+
Athletes for Team Russia wear matching attire for the 2014 Opening Ceremony in Sochi.

Athletes for Team Russia wear matching attire for the 2014 Opening Ceremony in Sochi.

Robert Deutsch/USA TODAY Sports

Robert Deutsch/USA TODAY Sports

Athletes for Team Russia wear matching attire for the 2014 Opening Ceremony in Sochi.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






BRUNSWICK, OH- The Winter Olympics are this February in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and while 206 countries will compete for gold, Russia will not be one of them.

Russian athletes were banned by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on December 5th for “the systemic manipulation of the anti-doping rules” during the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, states the IOC. Over 1,000 Russian athletes, according to NPR, did not uphold their anti-doping obligations and thus will not be allowed to compete.

Russian athletes (not of those 1,000) who still wish to compete, will need to be found clean, undergo regular testing, and pass other testing to make sure that no participant has an unfair advantage. Following these standards, Russian athletes will be required to wear a uniform with “Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR)” on it, and compete for the Olympic flag, (rather than simply “Russia” and the Russian flag,) during the games. In the case of a medal victory for the OAR team, the Olympic anthem will be played instead of Russia’s national anthem, states the IOC.

Whether or not these many hoops are fair to the clean athletes who now have to jump through them is highly debatable. It is also potentially deterring; and the 2018 Olympic Games do not have much room to deter athletes, as the National Hockey League (NHL) has already done so with its athletes, informing them as early as April 3rd, that they are not allowed to participate in Pyeongchang.

So what does this mean with the games just two months away? Only time will tell. The IOC, Russian athletes, and Russian Olympic Committee each have tough things to think about. It can only be hoped that the poor choices of a few do not take away from the hard work and dedication of some of the world’s best athletes, and that the Olympics can continue to unite nations for years to come.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
The student news site of Brunswick High School
A controversy of Olympic caliber: Pyeongchang 2018